Recent Point Posts

My friend Keri Jacobs co-founded a ministry called 22 Too Many. The ministry’s name serves as a reminder that, tragically, every day, 22 military veterans take their own lives.

As Keri noted on the group's Facebook page, yesterday was Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Day. This week, please remember to pray, not only for the safety of our soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines serving around the world, but also for their safety when they get home, suffering from PTSD. You can read some of their stories, and find out more in general, at the group's website.
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I posted earlier about the Supreme Court deciding against taking up the case on pharmicists' conscience rights. Alliance Defending Freedom now has more material on their site about the decision. Senior Counsel Kristen Waggoner says: "All Americans should be free to peacefully live and work consistent with their faith without fear of unjust punishment, and no one should be forced to participate in the taking of human life. We had hoped that the U.S. Supreme Court would take this opportunity to reaffirm these long-held principles. The state of Washington allows pharmacists to refer customers for just about any reason—except reasons of conscience. Singling out people of faith and denying them the same freedom to refer is a violation of federal law."
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Online "fact-checkers" are notoriously slanted. Most of us don't take their claims to objectivity that seriously. But reading Snopes.com on controversial political topics is irresistably funny. Confronted with a demonstrable fact that's inconvenient for the far left, Snopes will reluctantly rate it "mostly true," or "mixed," and then follow up with an editorial on why that fact doesn't mean what you think it does.

By way of example, the Snopes entry on Orlando shooter Omar Mateen's political affiliation rates the claim that "Mateen was a registered Democrat" as a "mixture" of truth and falsehood. How, you ask, can a simple "yes" or "no" question ("was Mateen registered as a Democrat?") possibly yield a "mixed" answer? That's where the magic comes in, baby.
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The Court ruled 5-3 that the law, which required that Texas abortion clinics be held to stricter medical standards, would make it too difficult to obtain an abortion. The Stream has the story.

Somehow this decision to lower standards is supposed to be good for women's health. Don't ask me how.
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This Saturday in Washington, D.C., the National Organization for Marriage will sponsor a March for Marriage, to protest the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision and the president's decree on school bathrooms and locker rooms, and to call for congressional action. Click here for details!
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I love apologetics. It’s fun to teach apologetics, discuss apologetics, and offer reasons for what I believe to non-Christians who ask. Yet, quite clearly, not all Christians share my enthusiasm. Why not? Below are five common reasons why many Christians dismiss apologetics (thanks to my Twitter friends, acknowledged below).

[For more, go to Sean's blog!]
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In a tragic development, drones are now delivering abortion pills to women in Ireland.
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In my last post I offered the biblical prophet Daniel as an example to graduates of how to stay strong in their faith during college. Even though Daniel was in a foreign culture, not unlike where college freshmen will soon find themselves, he stood strong because Daniel determined in his heart beforehand not to defile himself (Daniel 1:8). Daniel had his heart set on doing right before the pressure came and that made all the difference.

In this post I want to offer three practical ways you can purpose beforehand to do the right thing so you can thrive in college rather than crash. Following are three specific issues you will soon face as you move into university life.

[To read more, go to Sean's blog!]

Dear Graduates,

Excitement. Anticipation. Eagerness. Anxiety. Fear. My guess is that these emotions, and many more, are going through your heart and mind right now as you prepare to leave high school for the “real world.” Not too long ago I was in the same boat. I have since learned some powerful lessons I would like to share with you. Will you allow me to share some personal encouragement and insights to help you succeed in college? I want nothing more than to see my own students flourish as followers of Jesus in college. And I want the same for you. If you read this two-part series you will be miles ahead of many of your peers. Prayerfully take these words to heart and I believe they could make all the difference for you.

[Go to Sean's blog to read more!]
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A provocative article in TIME suggests that it has:

"With every move documented in real-time on social media, parents have lost control of the very personal narrative of their real lives. What has for years been a cute story at my family barbecue about the time my mom lost me as a toddler at Disney World would today be a hotly contested debate amid strangers online. These strangers feel they not only have the right to comment and judge all involved, but also to take action, in the form of harassment, badgering, petitions or even phone calls to authorities. There is no such thing as an honest mistake for parents anymore."

Unfortunately, as recent events have demonstrated, there's plenty of truth in this statement. All the more reason for Christian parents to remember to rely on God for their sense of self-worth, and not to be tempted to get it from others -- especially others on the internet.
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Looks like NARAL Pro-Choice America just beat out Old Navy for Worst Father's Day Shirt.
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The Atlantic has a fascinating story on the scrap of papyrus that had so many convinced that Jesus was married. It's a cautionary tale of vested interests, unethical practices, shoddy scholarship, and headline hunters, and it's very much worth a read.
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Former BreakPoint intern Leah Hickman's profound new blog posts on suffering were inspired by a British miniseries. But they take on new relevance in light of recent events.

"Yes, there may be a time to laugh. And yes, laughter is often a fine response to the folly of this world. But that time to laugh is not forever. There is a time to mourn as well, and we have plenty to mourn for when it comes to God’s creation and his desperate creatures who have turned from him and his perfect standards. As I spent some time reflecting on the sickening truth that was revealed through a simple and fake story depicted on the silver screen, I began to realize the purpose of sackcloth and ashes."
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An unoriginal observation, based on a few recent events:

Social issues are usually considered the haunt of the dreaded religious right. The more libertarian and fiscally conservative out there tend to see them as distractions or intrusions on private life. And the liberal-minded almost universally see them as areas where religious fundamentalists have long tried to force their beliefs on other people.

But one of the fundamental truths everyone needs to understand about social issues is that they're intimately linked with the size and scope of government.
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Judge Diane Bull has dismissed one of the misdemeanor charges against David Daleiden of the Center for Medical Progress. As you'll recall, charges were brought against Daleiden in response to his undercover investigation of Planned Parenthood's trafficking in fetal body parts. "Instead of prosecuting Planned Parenthood for selling aborted baby parts, Daleiden was indicted for buying them," as LifeNews puts it.

The charge of using a false ID is still pending. But thank God for some good news at last.
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