Why the Outrage?


I’m glad everyone’s mad about this, though I’m not sure why. For the Chuck Colson Center for Christian Worldview, I’m John Stonestreet with The Point.

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In one of the most disturbing stories I can remember, The Telegraph reports that the remains of over 15,000 babies—many of them victims of abortion—were incinerated in British hospitals during the last two years, and their heat used to generate electricity.

It’s evil and bizarre, harkening back to idolatrous pagans in the Old Testament offering their children as burnt sacrifices to the idol, Moloch.

The Health Minister called it “totally unacceptable.” The Chief Inspector of Hospitals said it was a breach of trust, and the Health Department issued an immediate ban on the practice.

Puzzling over this reaction, Dr. Al Mohler commented, “We are living in a time when…you can use the words ‘acceptable’ and ‘appropriate’ meaning how to kill babies and dispose of the remains… as if it’s ever acceptable or appropriate?

He’s right, and the public outrage over this shows again that everyone really knows what a fetus is. We’re just not consistent. I’m John Stonestreet.


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Further Reading

Aborted babies incinerated to heat UK hospitals
By Sarah Knapton |telegraph.co.uk |March 24, 2014

Sacrificed to Molek: 15,000 aborted babies burned as fuel to heat UK hospitals
Albert Mohler | albertmohler.com | March 25, 2014



http://www.breakpoint.org/features-columns/breakpoint-columns/entry/2/24604

Comments:

Our Outrage Stems from the Novelty
.
Not the depth of the evil.

I remarked on this in a recent BreakPoint Features article:

“Witnessing Christian apathy on abortion makes me wonder if Auschwitz enraged us not so much for the depth as for the novelty of its evil. After all, we weren't accustomed in the 1940s to mass-produced, assembly-line murder. These days we are.”

http://www.breakpoint.org/features-columns/articles/breakpoint-features-archive/entry/12/24622

Sadly, abortion is largely ho-hum for most of us. It no longer shocks our sensibilities. We've resigned ourselves to living with it. We've come to accept it as a part of modern life.

This fact alone is a telling measure of the sickness of our society – and our churches.